Seared Ginger Balsamic Salmon with Hot and Sour Slaw

4 servings

4 six-ounce pieces center-cut salmon fillets with skin, patted dry
1 teaspoon
salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

2 teaspoons olive or canola oil
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
3 ½ cups or one 9-ounce bag pre-shredded broccoli slaw
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons chopped fresh ginger
1 medium red pepper, cored, seeded, and cut into dice
2 tablespoons rice wine or sake

Hot and Sour Dressing, (combine all in a small bowl)
¼ cup soy sauce
¼ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons Chinese black vinegar or Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons olive or canola oil for frying fish
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
1 cup water
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1½ tablespoons light brown sugar

1. Season the salmon fillets with salt and pepper.

2. Heat a wok or a heavy skillet and the olive or canola and sesame oil until hot, but not smoking. Add the red pepper flakes and ginger, and stir-fry until fragrant, about 10 seconds. Add the diced red pepper and toss lightly over high heat. Add the broccoli slaw, toss lightly, and pour in the rice wine. Stir and cover. Cook over medium-high heat for a minute or two. Uncover and add the pre-mixed Dressing. Toss lightly for a minute and remove to a serving bowl.

3. Heat the 2 teaspoons oil in a 12-inch, non-stick skillet over moderately

high heat until very hot, about 10 seconds. Arrange the salmon fillets in the pan, skin side up, partially cover and sear over medium-high heat until well browned, about 5 to 6 minutes. Turn the fish over and continue cooking, for about 5 to 6 minutes, or until the fish flakes in the middles when prodded with a knife.
4. Using a slotted spoon or a spatula, portion some of the slaw on individual serving plates or serve in a serving bowl. Place the cooked salmon fillets on top.

5. Drain off any oil and reheat the frying pan with the balsamic vinegar, water, lemon juice, brown sugar, and ginger, stirring to combine. Simmer over medium heat-high heat for about 1½ to 2 minutes until thickened and reduced to 1/3 cup. Carefully pour the glaze over the salmon and serve with the hot and sour slaw. Serve with rice or another whole grain.

Warm Roasted Vegetable Quinoa Salad
6 Servings

Roasting vegetables is so easy, and you can vary the recipe depending on what’s in season. I especially like to serve roasted veggies with a nutty grain like quinoa as a meal by itself, or as a side to grilled, roasted, or pan-seared meat or seafood.

2 medium fennel bulbs (about 1½ pounds) rinsed, drained, stocks cut off and discarded*

2 medium red onions, peeled

1 pound pre-peeled baby carrots, rinsed and drained

1 eight-ounce package teriyaki, Thai, or lemon pepper-flavored baked tofu (optional)

Flavorings, (combine all in a small bowl):

½ cup balsamic vinegar

3 tablespoons minced fresh ginger

1/3 cup virgin olive oil

1 cup quinoa

1½ teaspoons virgin olive oil for toasting quinoa

Dressing (combine all in a small glass bowl until the sugar dissolves):

3 tablespoons soy sauce

6 tablespoons water

1 tablespoon minced garlic

2 teaspoons sugar

5 tablespoons chopped parsley

1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Trim the stem end of the fennel bulbs, leaving 1/8 inch of the root base, and cut each fennel bulb in half. With the cut edge down, cut each half into thin slices about ¼-inch thick. Place the fennel slices in a large mixing bowl.

2. Cut the red onions in half, then cut each half into ¼-inch thick slices. Put in the bowl and add the carrots. Cut the baked tofu into ¼-inch thick slices and 1½ inches long. Add to the vegetables.

3. Pour in the flavorings and toss lightly to coat. Place the vegetables in a large roasting pan or on a cookie sheet and bake about 40 minutes. Flip the vegetables over and continue baking for another 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender and golden brown at the edges.

4. Rinse the quinoa in a bowl, using your hands as a rake, and drain in a colander. Heat the oil for toasting the quinoa until hot, about 20 seconds, in a saucepan with lid. Add the quinoa and toast, stirring with a wooden spoon, until golden brown, about 4 to 5 minutes. Add 1¼ cups water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat, uncover, and fluff with a fork. Spoon the quinoa into the bottom of a large serving bowl.

5. Spoon the roasted vegetables over the quinoa and pour the prepared dressing over all. Toss lightly and serve warm or at room temperature.

© Copyright Nina Simonds 2011

Five-Spice Quinoa with Toasted Almonds
4 to 6 servings

Five- spice powder is a seasoning which usually includes star anise, cinnamon, licorice root, fennel, and black or Sichuan pepper. It plays well against the slight nuttiness of quinoa, a grain that is rich in protein. Toasting the quinoa in a little oil adds a pleasing nuance of flavor.

2 cups quinoa

1 ½ tablespoon olive or canola oil

3 tablespoons minced scallions

1 ½ tablespoons minced fresh ginger

½ teaspoon five-spice powder

Sauce, mixed together:

2 ¾ cups vegetarian broth

1 ½ tablespoons soy sauce

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil

½ cup toasted sliced almonds

1. Rinse the quinoa, if necessary, in a bowl, using your hand as a rake and drain in a colander.

2. Heat the oil in a medium-size saucepan with a lid until very hot, about 20 seconds. Add the scallions and ginger and stir-fry over medium high heat until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the quinoa and stir-fry for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the Sauce mixture and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook for about 15 minutes, until the liquid is absorbed. The quinoa should be tender to the bite. Remove from the heat, uncover, and fluff with a fork

3. If the almonds aren’t toasted, fry then until golden brown in a dry frying pan over medium heat, stirring constantly. Let the quinoa cool slightly and then stir in the toasted almonds. Taste for seasoning, adding salt or soy sauce if necessary. Serve warm or at room temperature as a staple dish instead of rice or couscous.

© Copyright Nina Simonds 2011

Juicy Candied Ginger Orange Slices
4 to 6 servings

This is one of the fastest and easiest recipes in my dessert repertory so it has become one of my orange-season favorites. If you are feeling decadent, serve it with vanilla or chocolate ice cream.

5 Navel oranges, peeled

4 tablespoons honey

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 tablespoons chopped candied ginger (optional)

1. Cut the oranges into ½-inch slices and place in a bowl. Add the honey, cinnamon, and candied ginger, and very carefully mix together to coat the slices.

2. Arrange the slices in a large overlapping circle on a dessert platter and let sit for 15 minutes at room temperature. Serve.

Oranges are packed with flavonoids and Vitamin C. When eaten whole, the pith provides anti-cancer agents and important bioflavonoids. Oranges are also rich in fiber.

© Copyright Nina Simonds 2011

Asian Fish Chowder with Fresh Basil

6 Servings

1½ pounds firm-fleshed fish fillets, such as cod, sea bass, halibut, or red snapper, skin removed

6 slices fresh ginger, smashed with the flat side of a knife

3 tablespoons rice wine or sake

2 large fennel bulbs, (about 1½ lbs.), stalks and root base trimmed, leaving   bulb with 1/8 inch of stem

1½ teaspoons olive or canola oil

3 tablespoons chopped garlic (about 8 cloves)

½ cup scallions, white and green parts (about 3-4)

6 cups good quality store-bought chicken stock, preferably low-sodium

½ cup rice wine or sake

½  pound somen, angel hair, or other thin noodles

2 tablespoons Thai fish sauce

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

¾ cup Thai holy basil or sweet basil leaves, chopped or finely shredded

1. Using a sharp knife, cut the fish into chunks, about 1½ inches square. Place the fish in one bowl. Add the ginger and rice wine and toss lightly to coat. Cut each fennel bulb in half lengthwise. With the cut side down, cut each half into slices about ¼-inch thick.

2. Bring 3 quarts of water to a boil, add the noodles, and cook until near tender or al dente. Drain in a colander and rinse under warm, running water.

3. Heat the oil in a large soup pot until hot over high heat, about 20 seconds. Add the garlic and scallions and stir-fry over high heat until fragrant, about 15 seconds. Add the chicken stock and rice wine and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium, add the fennel, and partially cover the pot. Cook for 10 to 12 minutes, until the fennel is almost tender. Discard the ginger slices from the fish and add the fish chunks with the marinade to the pot. Cover and cook 5 to 6 minutes, or until the fish pieces flake when prodded with a knife. Divide the noodles among the serving bowls.

4. Add the fish sauce, black pepper, lemon juice and fresh basil, and stir gently to marry the flavors. Taste for seasoning, adding more fish sauce if it needs salt. Ladle the soup over the noodles and serve.

Variation: Substitute striped bass, tilapia, haddock, shrimp or scallops for the cod, cooking the fish until it is flaky, and the shrimp and scallops until they are firm and completely cooked.

Cinnamon Beef Noodles

This is the dish I crave when I am feeling a cold or the flu coming on—a big bowl of noodles topped with spinach and tender pieces of beef infused with garlic, ginger, anise, and cinnamon. The flavor gets better and better every time you reheat it.

1 teaspoon safflower or corn oil

Chile-Cinnamon Seasonings
6 scallions, trimmed, cut into 1 ½ inch sections, and smashed lightly with the flat side of a knife
6 cloves garlic, peeled, smash lightly with the flat side of a cleaver, and thinly sliced
4 slices fresh ginger (about the size of a quarter(, smashed lightly with the flat side of a knife
1 ½ teaspoons hot chile paste
2 cinnamon sticks
1 teaspoon aniseed

8 ½ cups water
½ cup soy sauce
2 pounds chuck or beef stew meat, trimmed of fat and gristle, and cut into 1 ½ inch cubes
10-ounces spinach, trimmed, rinsed, and drained
½ pound flat Chinese wheat-flour noodles, udon, or other flat noodles, such as fettuccine, cooked until just tender, rinsed under warm water, and drained
3 tablespoons minced scallions

1. Heat a large pot or casserole over medium high heat. Add the oil and heat until hot, about 30 seconds. Add the chile-cinnamon seasonings and stir-fry until fragrant, about 15 seconds. Add the water and soy sauce and bring to a boil. Add the beef and bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 ½ hours, or until the beef is very tender. Skim the surface to remove any impurities or fat. Remove the ginger slices and cinnamon sticks and discard. Add the spinach and bring to a boil.
2. Divide the noodles among six soup bowls. Ladle the meat, spinach, and broth over the noodles and sprinkle with the scallions. Serve.

6 Servings

Nina Simonds © 2011

 

Spunky Stir-fried Ramen


Walk around any city or town in Japan and you will see some version of this dish. When I’m rushed, which is most of the time, I use the instant “ramen,” discarding the flavor package, dipping the noodles in boiling water, and tossing them quickly in the sauce.
1 pound boneless center-cut pork loin, fat trimmed and cut into thin julienne strips

Marinade Mix together:
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 ½ tablespoons minced gingerroot
1 tablespoon minced garlic

4 ½ tablespoons safflower or corn oil
2 cups sliced onions, cut into thin julienne shreds
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper, or to taste
4 cups sliced Chinese Napa cabbage, stem section trimmed, slices laid flat and cut lengthwise in half, then into thin julienne shreds, leaf and stem sections separated
1 cup grated carrots
1 ½ tablespoons rice wine or sake

Sauce Mix together:
¼ cup soy sauce
3 tablespoons rice wine or sake
1 ½ tablespoons sugar
1 ½ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
½ teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

¾ pound fine dried Japanese ramen, Chinese egg noodles, or angel hair pasta, cooked until just tender, rinsed, and drained

1. In a bowl, mix the meat with the marinade, toss lightly, and let marinate for 30 minutes.
2. Heat a wok or a skillet, add 3 tablespoons of oil, and heat until near smoking. Add the pork, stir-fry until the shreds separate and change color, remove, and drain. Wipe out the pan and reheat.
3. Add the remaining oil and heat over high heat until hot. Add the onions and crushed pepper, and stir-fry about 1 minute. Add the cabbage shreds. Toss lightly for 1 minute and add the carrots and rice wine. Cook for another minute and add the sauce. Heat until boiling. Add the cooked pork and the noodles, and toss lightly to blend. Transfer to a platter and serve immediately.

6 Servings

Nina Simonds © 2011

 

Shrimp and Pea Shoot Soup



This is the quintessential Chinese soup—an extra-light, fresh, and refined broth, brimming with barely poached seafood. Pea shoots are the delicate leafy tendrils of snow pea vines. They’re sold in Asian markets and specialty food shops. If pea shoots aren’t available, substitute snow peas or snap peas.
5 ½ ounces somen or other very thin noodles, such as angel hair, cooked until just tender, rinsed under warm water, and drained
2 pound medium shrimp, peeled, scored down the back, deveined, and rinsed
2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine or sake
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon safflower or corn oil
1 tablespoon minced scallions (white part only)
2 teaspoons minced garlic
½ pound pea shoots, touch stems removed, wilted leaves discarded, and cut into 2-inch lengths
¼ cup Chinese rice wine or sake
5 ½ cups Chinese Chicken Broth
1 ½ teaspoons salt, or to taste

Chinese Chicken Broth
3 ½ pounds chicken bones, necks, backs, and/or pieces
9 cups water
1 cup Chinese rice wine or sake
6 slices fresh ginger (about the size of a quarter), lightly smashed with the flat side of a knife
1. Divide the noodles equally among six soup bowls.
2. In a medium bowl, combine the shrimp with the rice wine and ginger, tossing lightly to coat.
3. To make the broth, combine the chicken bones, water, rice wine, and ginger in a large pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 1 ½ hours, skimming the surface to remove any foam or impurities. Strain through a fine strainer and remove fat. Measure out 5 ½ cups.
3. Heat a heavy pot over medium-high heat. Add the oil and heat until hot, about 30 seconds. Add the scallions and garlic and stir-fry for 15 seconds, or until fragrant. Add the pea shoots and rice wine, turn up the heat to high, and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the broth and salt and bring to a boil. Add the shrimp and simmer for about 1 ½ minutes, until they turn pink, skimming the broth to remove any foam or impurities. Taste for seasoning, ladle the soup over the noodles, and serve.

6 Servings
Nina Simonds © 2011

 

Nutty Soba Noodle Pot  with Chicken and Scallions

2 whole boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 1 ¼ pounds)
3 tablespoons rice wine or sake
½ pound soba noodles
1½ teaspoons olive or canola oil
8 whole scallions, trimmed, and chopped (about 1 cup)
1½ tablespoons minced garlic
8 cups chicken stock, preferably low-sodium
3 tablespoons soy sauce
7-8 ounces baby spinach, rinsed and drained
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

1. Using a sharp knife, separate the two breasts. Cut the chicken crosswise into thin slices about 1/4-inch thick. Place the chicken in a bowl, add the rice wine, toss lightly to coat, and set aside.
2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the soba noodles, return to a boil, and cook for 3 to 3 ½ minutes until al dente or nearly tender. Drain and rinse under warm, running water. Divide the noodles evenly among 6 soup bowls.
3. Heat the oil in a casserole or Dutch oven until hot. Add the chopped scallions and garlic and stir-fry over high heat until fragrant, about 20 seconds.  Add the chicken stock and soy sauce and bring to a gentle boil over medium heat. Add the chicken slices and cook for 5 or 6 minutes, or until almost cooked completely, skimming any foam or scum from the surface. Stir in the sesame oil and the spinach leaves, cover the pot and cook for about a minute, until the leaves are just wilted. Taste for seasoning, adding more soy sauce if necessary.
4. Ladle the chicken, spinach, and hot broth over the noodles, and serve immediately.

6 Servings

Nina Simonds © 2011

Garlic Beef with Shiitake Mushrooms on Golden Noodles

Few dishes are as seductively sumptuous as thin slices of beef, shiitake mushrooms, and snow peas bathed in a velvety oyster sauce on a bed of tender noodles. I’ve updated this Cantonese classic with fresh shiitake mushrooms rather than dried. For convenience, I sometimes broil the noodles (see page 18). You can substitute cremini mushrooms.

1 ½ pounds flank steak, London broil, or boneless sirloin steak, trimmed of fat and gristle

Beef Marinade Mix together:
3 ½ tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine or sake
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 tablespoon cornstarch

5 ½ tablespoons safflower or corn oil
½ pound shiitake mushrooms, rinsed, drained, stems removed, and caps thinly sliced
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 ½ tablespoons minced fresh ginger

¾ pound Chinese snow peas, ends trimmed and strings removed
2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine or sake

Oyster Sauce Mix together:
1 ½ cups Chinese Chicken Broth (page 53)
6 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 ½ tablespoons Chinese rice wine or sake
1 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
1 ½ tablespoons cornstarch

¾ pound thin noodles, pan-fried (page 18) and kept warm in a low oven

1. Cut the meat into 1/6-inch-thick slices. In a bowl, combine them with the marinade, tossing lightly to coat.
2. Heat a wok or a heavy skillet over high heat. Add 3 ½ tablespoons of the oil and heat until almost smoking hot. Add the beef slices and stir-fry over high heat until they lose their pink color and separate. Remove with a handled strainer or a slotted spoon and drain in a colander. Wipe out the wok.
3. Reheat the wok, add the remaining 2 tablespoons oil, and heat until hot, about 20 seconds. Add the mushrooms, garlic, and ginger and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the snow peas and rice wine and stir-fry for 1 ½ minutes. Add the oyster sauce and cook, stirring constantly to prevent lumps, until thickened. Add the beef and toss gently in the sauce. Spoon over the noodles and serve.

6 servings
© Nina Simonds 2011

 

 

Vietnamese Spring Rolls


These delicate rolls are perfect portable little noodle salads. They are great for entertaining. Simply prepare them several hours in advance and cover with plastic wrap to keep them moist. You can add barbecued pork (as in the classic recipe) or substitute other cooked meat or seafood).

1 pound pork tenderloin, trimmed of fat and gristle

Garlicky Marinade Blend together
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 ½ tablespoons minced garlic
1 ½ tablespoons honey

½ pound thin rice stick noodles (vermicelli), softened in hot water, cooked until just tender, rinsed under cold water, and drained
2 large carrots, peeled and shredded or grated
¾ cup fresh mint leaves, coarsely shredded
¾ cup fresh cilantro leaves, coarsely shredded

35 round rice paper wrappers (about 8 inches in diameter)
2 heads Boston lettuce, leaves separated, rinsed, dried, and the tough center ribs trimmed
1 ½ pounds medium shrimp, poached in boiling water until pink, peeled, sliced in half lengthwise, and deveined

Spicy Sweet-and-Sour Dipping Sauce and Peanut Sauce for dipping

1. Preheat the oven to 375F. Put the pork in an aluminum foil-lined baking pan, add the garlicky marinade, and turn to coat. Roast about 35 minutes, or until the pork is cooked through. Let cool, then cut into thin 1 ½ inch long slices.
2. In a large bowl, toss together the pork, rice noodles, carrots, mint, and cilantro.
3. Fill a wide shallow pan with hot water and spread a dish towel out on a work surface. Dip a rice wrapper into the warm water for about 3seconds, until softened, and place it in front of you on the towel.
4. Place a lettuce leaf on the lower third of the rice wrapper. Arrange 2 tablespoons of the noodle mixture on the lettuce. Fold the bottom edge over the filing, tucking in the sides. Place 2 shrimp halves, cut side down, and roll up into a tight cylinder. Place the roll on a platter and cover with a damp towel to prevent it from drying out. Repeat with the remaining wrappers, filling, and shrimp. Serve with sweet-and-sour sauce and spicy peanut sauce.

Makes 35 Rolls

© Nina Simonds 2011

 

 

Spicy Korean Beef Noodles

I crave spicy seasonings like garlic, ginger, and hot chiles. And I love to counterbalance the heat with fresh vegetables such as the lettuce wrappers in this dish. The crisp fried rice stick noodles add yet another textural contrast to the tender cooked beef.

2 heads Boston lettuce, leaves separated, rinsed, and dried
2 ounces thin rice stick noodles, deep-fried as directed on page 10

Korean Seasonings
3 ½ tablespoons minced scallions (white part only)
1 ½ tablespoons minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 ½ teaspoons toasted sesame oil

½ pound lean ground beef

1 ½ teaspoons safflower or corn oil

Spicy Sauce Mix together:
5 tablespoons Chinese ground bean sauce or sweet bean paste
¼ cup sugar
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 ½ teaspoons hot chile paste

1 pound firm tofu, wrapped in paper towels and weighted for 30 minutes, then cut into ¼ inch cubes

1. Trim any touch center ribs from the lettuce leaves and press them gently to flatten them. Arrange in a basket or a serving bowl. Arrange the fried noodles on a serving platter, crumbling them gently to break them up.
2. In a medium bowl, combine the Korean seasonings. Add the beef and mix well.
3. Heat a wok or a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil and heat until hot, about 30 seconds. Add the meat and stir-fry, breaking up any lumps, until it loses its pink color. Drain in a colander and wipe out the wok.
4. Reheat the wok, add the spicy sauce, cooking and stirring until it reduces and thickens, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the tofu and beef and toss to coat. Spoon the mixture over the fried noodles. To eat, spoon about 1 ½ tablespoons of the noodle mixture onto a lettuce leaf and roll it up, tucking in the sides.

6 Servings

© Nina Simonds 2011

Tofu Noodle Salad with a Spicy Tahini Dressing

6 Servings

Sichuanese chefs make a spicy toasted sesame dressing for the popular classic, Dan Dan Noodles. Drawing inspiration from this dish, I’ve created a similar sauce using untoasted tahini paste, which is sold in every supermarket. The flavor is lighter, but no less appealing. Make a big batch and refrigerate so you can spontaneously prepare a salad for a quick and healthy meal.

11/2 pounds very firm tofu squares
¾ to 4 ounces cellophane noodles, softened in boiling water for 10 minutes
2 cups shredded or grated carrots
2 tablespoons virgin olive or canola oil
2  English seedless cucumbers, cut in half lengthwise
2 cups bean sprouts, rinsed and drained
3 stalks scallions, green section only, cut into ½-inch lengths

Spicy Tahini Dressing, mixed together in a bowl:
1 cup Middle Eastern sesame tahini paste
¼ cup soy sauce
¼ cup sugar
3 tablespoons rice wine or sake
¼ cup toasted sesame oil
4 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
3  tablespoons minced garlic
1½  teaspoons hot chili paste, or to taste
10 tablespoons water

1. Cut the tofu through the thickness in half and wrap in paper towels. Put a heavy weight such as a pot on top, and drain, changing the towels once, for about 10 minutes. Cut the pressed tofu into matchstick-sized shreds.
2. Bring a pot with three quarts of water to a boil, add the cellophane noodles and cook for about 1 minute, or until tender. Drain in a colander and rinse under cold, running water. Drain thoroughly.
3.Heat a large, non-stick frying pan, skillet, or a wok, add the olive or canola oil and heat until 375 degrees. Lay the pressed tofu slices in one layer and fry, over medium heat, until golden brown. It may take about 5-6 minutes. Turn over and fry again until golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Cut the tofu lengthwise into thin slices.
4. Scoop the seeds out of the cucumber with a spoon, then grate or shred the cucumber using the shredding blade of a food processor. Using your hands, squeeze out the liquid.  thickness in half and wrap in paper towels. Put a heavy weight, such as a pot, on top, and drain while preparing the other ingredients, changing the towels once.
5. Arrange the cellophane noodles in the bottom of a large serving bowl. Arrange the carrots, cucumbers, and bean sprouts in separate circles on top of the noodles, leaving a space in the middle for the fried tofu. Arrange the tofu in the center. Sprinkle the scallion greens on top.
6.Put the ingredients for the Spicy Tahini Dressing in a blender or the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade, and blend thoroughly. Taste for seasoning, adjusting if necessary. Pour a little of the Spicy Tahini Dressing on top of the salad, and serve the remainder in a bowl on the side. Serve at room temperature or chilled.

© Copyright Nina Simonds Simple Asian Meals 2012.

 

ROASTED TERIAKI VEGETABLES SKEWERS
4 to 6 servings

1 pound very firm tofu, cut across the length into 1-inch slabs   .
Teriaki  Marinade:
1/3 cup soy sauce
1/3 cup water
1/3 cup rice wine or sake
7 tablespoons sugar
1 ½ tablespoons minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon crushed dried chili flakes
1 ½ tablespoons cornstarch

1 medium red onion, outer skin removed
2 red or orange bell peppers                                                                          
½ pound cremini mushrooms
9 ten-inch bamboo skewers, soaked in water to cover for 10 minutes

1. Wrap the slabs of tofu in paper towels and set a heavy weight, such as a heavy skillet on top and let stand 15 minutes to remove excess water. Cut the tofu into 1-inch cubes.
2. While the tofu is sitting, mix together all the ingredients of the Teriaki marinade  in a heavy, medium-size saucepan and heat until thickened, stirring constantly over medium heat with a wooden spoon to prevent lumps. Remove and cool slightly. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
3. Remove the outer skin of the onion, cut in half, and then cut each half into half again. Separate the pieces. Remove the core and seeds from the pepper and cut into 1-inch squares.  Trim the stems of the crimini mushrooms.
4. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Alternately thread the skewers with the tofu, onion pieces, peppers, and onions, starting and ending with the onions. Arrange the skewered vegetable and tofu on the cookie sheet and pour the teriyaki sauce on top. Let he vegetables and tofu sit for 10 to 15 minutes.
5. Bake the tofu and vegetables for 20 minutes, turning once so that they evenly cook. Remove and arrange on a serving platter. Pour the warm teriaki sauce on top and serve with rice or another whole grain.

© Copyright Nina Simonds Simple Asian Meals 2012.

Disclaimer: Herbs, foods, and other natural remedies are not substitutes for professional medical care.
For a specific health problem, consult a qualified health-care giver for guidance.

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